Lutheran Church I

Lutheran Church, Main St Sharpsburg Maryland 1862
(US Library of Congress)

Confession time, I have been working on a digital model of the Lutheran Church for probably the last two years. When motivation struck I would work on it, and when it would fade the model would just gather digital dust on my hard drive. Difficulties in maintaining a solid model* with such detailed geometry saw me start over a few times, but with renewed purpose I am going (to try) and commit to getting it finished.

Luckily John Banks has already done the work of providing close ups of the photo (right) on his blog post: Antietam battle damage at Lutheran Church, not so fortunate is that the close ups show that I had made a few errors around the windows and for the front door, namely I had made the sash windows both top and bottom as 9 pane glass while the photo clearly shows the lower sash is only 6 pane**, so these will need to be rectified.

Given that the church no longer exists and I have been unable to find any other photos I will make the assumption that the far side of the church is a mirror of the photographed side, and I will exercise some poetic license and the rear of the building can have an off centre door but will be devoid of windows.

Close up of front door and steps
(from John Banks Civil War Blog)

The front door is quite recessed and from the photo (left) it appears to be of a traditional design. While the steps are quite “rustic” and almost falling down, so I will need to make sure these are modelled in a quite rough manner.

Although not related to the church per se is the photo below that shows a differing view of Sharpsburg’s Main St and is taken from the right of the church and looking down the hill. The house on the right (in the church photo) is now on the left and there are a few buildings offering inspiration, though they are simply variants of each other, so possibly quite easy to model.

Sharpsburg, Principal St Maryland 1862.
(US Library of Congress)

* A 3D digital model needs to be “solid” to print optimally. Which is to say it does not have any “holes” that lead into its geometry and thus create a model of exposed planes, rather than a “solid”. There are websites and plugins that try to correct these errors in the mesh, but there is no substitute for creating the model properly from the start.

** I know I mentioned somewhere else that I want my models to be as accurate as possible, while remaining usable and printable. Sometimes to get a usable model that is printable will mean small compromises in accuracy but it is something I try to avoid.

Reading (still): Welker, David A., The Cornfield, Antietam’s bloody turning point. (2020) ISBN: 978-1-61200-832-5

Dunker Church III

Poor painting not withstanding the model is basically done

It was my second “real” post on this blog and was supposed to be the one of the major reasons for writing, chiefly being a collection of research notes and then a displaying of the final 3D models I had managed to craft from said research.

But life and the hobby seems to throw lots of “shiny” at us to serve as a distraction* and delay to our plans. Not to mention a slight pedantry that forces more than a few “do-overs” as I try to make it as perfect as possible.

No battle plan survives contact with the enemy

Helmth von Moltke

I think the same can be said that any wargaming project does not survive contact with the painting table. Or at least I find it so…so maybe my planning needs a little more work?

So fingers crossed, the next plan is to tackle the Lutheran Church from Sharpsburg, made famous by the Andrew Gardner photo, and then maybe the Miller Farm, so I can bookend the Antietam cornfield.

* I have supported all the Blood and Plunder Kickstarters, which sit unpainted next to my painting bench seemingly in accusation of their neglected state and teasing that they would be such fun…must resist…28mm…pirates…so tempting.

Reading (still): Welker, David A., The Cornfield, Antietam’s bloody turning point. (2020) ISBN: 978-1-61200-832-5

Ratified Research

So the Waterloo Uncovered project had a bit of a write-up in the Dailymail, about their Waterloo Project Model and although not one of my usual reads, the photo above (left) really piqued my interest as it showed the front of the La Haye Sainte barn with an arched door and no chicken coup access unlike commercially available products.

Of more interest to me is that it is depicted just as my own research had shown and as I had designed for my kickstarter (at right) many years ago. So feeling a bit chuffed at the moment, which is a great way to improve the mood in these times of restrictions.

And yes, this is a blatant tooting of my own horn.

Reading (still): Welker, David A., The Cornfield, Antietam’s bloody turning point. (2020) ISBN: 978-1-61200-832-5